The limitations of quantitative social science for informing public policy – Evidence & Policy: A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice

ABSTRACT Quantitative social science (QSS) has the potential to make an important contribution to public policy. However it also has a number of limitations. The aim of this paper is to explain these limitations to a non-specialist audience and to identify a number of ways in which QSS research could be improved to better inform … [Read More] The limitations of quantitative social science for informing public policy – Evidence & Policy: A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice

The Quality of Work in a Changing Labour Market – Social Policy & Administration

ABSTRACT There have been sharply contrasting scenarios of the long-term pattern of change in the quality of work and employment in the advanced societies. Three broad perspectives have dominated enquiry in the last three decades: an optimistic tradition emphasizing progressive improvement in skills and the quality of work; a pessimistic tradition underlining emerging threats to … [Read More] The Quality of Work in a Changing Labour Market – Social Policy & Administration

Event: Affective Shifts: Inside and Outside Nation and Body – The Forced Migration Research Network, UNSW (Australia) & RCOA

Sydney, 21 February 2017 The Forced Migration Research Network, UNSW (Australia) will be hosting the Academic Symposium,  “Affective Shifts: Inside and Outside Nation and Body”  on 21 February 2017. It is developed in partnership with the Refugee Council of Australia as a lead up to the Refugee Alternatives Conference, (http://www.refugeealternatives.org.au/event-info/unsw-academic-forum) This Academic Symposium is an attempt to rethink how … [Read More] Event: Affective Shifts: Inside and Outside Nation and Body – The Forced Migration Research Network, UNSW (Australia) & RCOA

Longitudinal Research: A panel discussion on conceptual issues, research design, and statistical techniques – Work, Aging and Retirement

ABSTRACT The goal of this article is to clarify the conceptual, methodological, and practical issues that frequently emerge when conducting longitudinal research, as well as in the journal review process. Using a panel discussion format, the current authors address 13 questions associated with 3 aspects of longitudinal research: conceptual issues, research design, and statistical techniques. … [Read More] Longitudinal Research: A panel discussion on conceptual issues, research design, and statistical techniques – Work, Aging and Retirement

Exploring the ethical issues related to visual methodology when including young children’s voice in wider research samples – International Journal of Inclusive Education

ABSTRACT Understanding and working with ethical issues when including young children in educational research is critical to ensuring their involvement is meaningful. Increasingly, different methodological approaches have been used to address some of these issues, and the use of visual methods is showing particular potential for its age appropriateness. This paper will specifically focus on … [Read More] Exploring the ethical issues related to visual methodology when including young children’s voice in wider research samples – International Journal of Inclusive Education

Exploring the Role of the Capability Approach in Social Innovation – Journal of Human Development and Capabilities

ABSTRACT The emergence of the co-operative movement in the nineteenth century with Robert Owen’s work in particular promoted innovation in the social field. In more recent times, the application of the concept has been in a wide range of sectors from civil society, government and the corporate world. The paper uses the Capability Approach (CA) … [Read More] Exploring the Role of the Capability Approach in Social Innovation – Journal of Human Development and Capabilities

What does Big Data mean to public affairs research? Understanding the methodological and analytical challenges – The Impact Blog at LSE

Extract from an article by Ines Mergel, R. Karl Rethemeyer, and Kimberley R. Isett The term ‘Big Data’ is often misunderstood or poorly defined, especially in the public sector. Ines Mergel, R. Karl Rethemeyer, and Kimberley R. Isett provide a definition that adequately encompasses the scale, collection processes, and sources of Big Data. However, while recognising … [Read More] What does Big Data mean to public affairs research? Understanding the methodological and analytical challenges – The Impact Blog at LSE

Righting the Wrongs of the Refugee System – Centre for Public Impact (UK)

Extract from an article by Matthew Mercer, Senior Editor You could say that Alexander Betts leads two parallel lives. Although he lives and works among the gleaming spires, cobbled lanes and tranquil quadrangles of Oxford University, his heart is with the tens of millions of refugees, forced from their homes and now desperate for any safe haven … [Read More] Righting the Wrongs of the Refugee System – Centre for Public Impact (UK)

We need to find new ways to measure the Australian labour force – The Conversation

Extract from an article by Phil Lewis How we track our economy influences everything from government spending and taxes to home lending and business investment. In our series The Way We Measure, we’re taking a close look at economic indicators to better understand what’s going on. Over the last few years, we’ve seen a massive shift … [Read More] We need to find new ways to measure the Australian labour force – The Conversation

Twitter can help with scientific dissemination but its influence on citation impact is less clear – The Impact Blog at LSE

Extract from an article by José Luis Ortega Researchers have long been encouraged to use Twitter. But does researchers’ presence on Twitter influence citations to their papers? José Luis Ortega explored to what extent the participation of scholars on Twitter can influence the tweeting of their articles and found that although the relationship between tweets and … [Read More] Twitter can help with scientific dissemination but its influence on citation impact is less clear – The Impact Blog at LSE

Outcome Reporting Bias in Government Sponsored Policy Evaluations: A Qualitative Content Analysis of 13 Studies – PLoS One

ABSTRACT The reporting of evaluation outcomes can be a point of contention between evaluators and policy-makers when a given reform fails to fulfil its promises. Whereas evaluators are required to report outcomes in full, policy-makers have a vested interest in framing these outcomes in a positive light–especially when they previously expressed a commitment to the … [Read More] Outcome Reporting Bias in Government Sponsored Policy Evaluations: A Qualitative Content Analysis of 13 Studies – PLoS One

Working with the media can be beneficial but linking to and citing your research should be compulsory – The Impact Blog at LSE

Extract from an article by Andy Tattersall It’s great when academic research is covered by the media but too often this coverage fails to link back to or properly cite the research itself. It’s time academics insisted on this and Andy Tattersall outlines the benefits of doing so. As well as pointing more people to your … [Read More] Working with the media can be beneficial but linking to and citing your research should be compulsory – The Impact Blog at LSE

Social protection and basic income in global policy – Global Social Policy

Extract from an article by Moritz von Gliszczynski Since the early 2000s, social protection has become a mainstay in global policy debates and has been recently named as an instrument to achieve the United Nation’s (UN) sustainable development goals (UN, 2016). This is the outcome of a long-term shift in policy: after decades of neglect at the global level, … [Read More] Social protection and basic income in global policy – Global Social Policy

“The Big Data rich and the Big Data poor”: the new digital divide raises questions about future academic research” – The Impact Blog at LSE

Extract from an article by Kate Metzler Data is being created faster than ever before. However, as Kate Metzler explains, limited access to this big data is creating a digital divide between large companies and the broader scholarly community. To compound this problem, there is also a big data analysis skills gap that further hinders the progress … [Read More] “The Big Data rich and the Big Data poor”: the new digital divide raises questions about future academic research” – The Impact Blog at LSE

From social security to social investment? Compensating and social investment welfare policies in a life-course perspective – Journal of European Social Policy

ABSTRACT This article contributes to the ongoing debate on the forms and characteristics of social investment policies and their potential trade-off with social security schemes by assessing developments of welfare spending profiles in 23 European welfare states in the 2000s. I argue that if a social investment turn has indeed occurred, it is not necessarily … [Read More] From social security to social investment? Compensating and social investment welfare policies in a life-course perspective – Journal of European Social Policy

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Posts are for information purposes and do not constitute endorsement by the Brotherhood of St Laurence