The Politics of ‘Minimum Wage’ Welfare States: The Changing Significance of the Minimum Wage in the Liberal Welfare Regime – Social Policy & Administration

ABSTRACT It is an indisputable reality that the English-speaking welfare states have retreated from their distinct postwar welfare state compromises in ways that prompt many to wonder what is still liberal about the liberal welfare states. Considering developments in minimum wage institutions and politics in five liberal welfare states, this article argues that the apparent … [Read More] The Politics of ‘Minimum Wage’ Welfare States: The Changing Significance of the Minimum Wage in the Liberal Welfare Regime – Social Policy & Administration

Sensible reform to finance affordable housing deserves cross-party support – The Conversation

Extract from an article by Julie Lawson, Honorary Associate Professor, RMIT University Treasurer Scott Morrison’s visit to … London last week [included] a lengthy meeting with the UK’s Housing Finance Corporation (THFC) to discuss an affordable housing financial intermediary with its chief executive, Piers Williamson. Founded in 1987 to make up for the shortfall in public funding, … [Read More] Sensible reform to finance affordable housing deserves cross-party support – The Conversation

Australian Social Policy Conference – UNSW

Sydney, 25–27 September 2017 The Australian Social Policy Conference (ASPC) is the pre-eminent multidisciplinary conference concerned with issues of social policy in Australia and beyond. It attracts over 350 participants from academia, government and the community social welfare sector internationally. The ASPC will address the most pressing challenges facing Australian policy makers, practitioners and researchers at … [Read More] Australian Social Policy Conference – UNSW

Andrea Sharam to research “Uberisation” of housing at new RMIT gig – The Fifth Estate

Extract from an article by Cameron Jewell Housing academic Dr Andrea Sharam has been appointed senior lecturer at the School of Property, Construction and Project Management at RMIT in Melbourne, following a six-year position as research fellow with the Institute for Social Research at Swinburne University of Technology. Dr Sharam’s recent research introduced the term … [Read More] Andrea Sharam to research “Uberisation” of housing at new RMIT gig – The Fifth Estate

Exploring the Role of the Capability Approach in Social Innovation – Journal of Human Development and Capabilities

ABSTRACT The emergence of the co-operative movement in the nineteenth century with Robert Owen’s work in particular promoted innovation in the social field. In more recent times, the application of the concept has been in a wide range of sectors from civil society, government and the corporate world. The paper uses the Capability Approach (CA) … [Read More] Exploring the Role of the Capability Approach in Social Innovation – Journal of Human Development and Capabilities

What does Big Data mean to public affairs research? Understanding the methodological and analytical challenges – The Impact Blog at LSE

Extract from an article by Ines Mergel, R. Karl Rethemeyer, and Kimberley R. Isett The term ‘Big Data’ is often misunderstood or poorly defined, especially in the public sector. Ines Mergel, R. Karl Rethemeyer, and Kimberley R. Isett provide a definition that adequately encompasses the scale, collection processes, and sources of Big Data. However, while recognising … [Read More] What does Big Data mean to public affairs research? Understanding the methodological and analytical challenges – The Impact Blog at LSE

Money for nothing: has the time come for universal basic income? The Conversation

Extract from an article by Mark Smith “Money for nothing” is not just a song from 1985 by Dire Straits but also, it seems, a new wave of policies supporting the government providing an income for citizens, regardless of their economic activity. Benoît Hamon, the surprise winner of the first round of the socialist primaries in … [Read More] Money for nothing: has the time come for universal basic income? The Conversation

Aussies are getting older, and the health workforce needs training to reflect it – The Conversation

Extract from an article by Deborah Parker This article is part of our series on older people’s health. It looks at the changes and processes that occur in our body as we age, the conditions we’re more likely to suffer from and what we can do to prevent them. As our population ages and life expectancy … [Read More] Aussies are getting older, and the health workforce needs training to reflect it – The Conversation

Not just a number? NEETs, data and datalogical systems – Information, Communication & Society

ABSTRACT This paper draws on empirical research with NEET populations (16–24-year-olds not in education, employment or training) in the U.K. in order to engage with issues around identification, data and metrics produced through datalogical systems. Our aim is to bridge contemporary discourses around data, digital bureaucracy and datalogical systems with empirical material drawn from a … [Read More] Not just a number? NEETs, data and datalogical systems – Information, Communication & Society

How is family housing property reshaping welfare regimes? The Fifth Estate

Extract from an article by Richard Ronald While intergenerational inequalities have become more pronounced in recent years, they also appear to have reinforced intergenerational cooperation and the revival of the family as a provider of welfare and economic security. Keynote speaker at the 10th Australasian Housing Researchers Conference 2017, Dr Richard Ronald from the Centre for … [Read More] How is family housing property reshaping welfare regimes? The Fifth Estate

Tensions and Contradictions in Australian Social Policy Reform: Compulsory Income Management and the National Disability Insurance Scheme – Australian Journal of Social Issues

ABSTRACT This paper explores contemporary contradictions and tensions in Australian social policy principles and governmental practices that are being used to drive behavioural change, such a compulsory income management. By means of compulsory income management the Australian Government determines how certain categories of income support recipients can spend their payments through the practice of quarantining a proportion of that payment. In … [Read More] Tensions and Contradictions in Australian Social Policy Reform: Compulsory Income Management and the National Disability Insurance Scheme – Australian Journal of Social Issues

Homelessness in the News – Week Beginning 30th Jan 2017

Brotherhood Library Staff will monitor press and add to this post throughout the week  Friday 3rd February Daily Telegraph – Lawyer says Vic homeless ban won’t work Thursday 2nd February The Age – Plan to ban homeless people from camping in the city The Australian – Cops and protesters clash over Melbourne homeless camp The Australian – Melbourne homeless … [Read More] Homelessness in the News – Week Beginning 30th Jan 2017

Compulsory income management and the national disability insurance scheme – Australian Journal of Social issues

ABSTRACT This paper explores contemporary contradictions and tensions in Australian social policy principles and governmental practices that are being used to drive behavioural change, such as compulsory income management. By means of compulsory income management the Australian Government determines how certain categories of income support recipients can spend their payments through the practice of quarantining … [Read More] Compulsory income management and the national disability insurance scheme – Australian Journal of Social issues

Brotherhood Research Forum: From Surviving to Thriving: Inclusive work and economic security for refugees and people seeking asylum – Brotherhood of St Laurence, TASA & MSEI

As global forced migration continues to grow, research into the recruitment barriers, support needs, and long-term economic contributions of humanitarian migrants has revealed insights that can inform policy and programs. Decent, secure and satisfying work is vital for achieving positive settlement outcomes for refugees and people seeking asylum. However, there is a gap in Australia … [Read More] Brotherhood Research Forum: From Surviving to Thriving: Inclusive work and economic security for refugees and people seeking asylum – Brotherhood of St Laurence, TASA & MSEI

Complexity Reduction and Policy Consensus: Asylum seekers, the right to work, and the ‘pull factor’ thesis in the UK context – The British Journal of Politics and International Relations

ABSTRACT Since the early 2000s, asylum policy in Western states has become increasingly dominated by the concept of the ‘pull factor’—the idea that the economic rights afforded to asylum seekers can act as a migratory pull, and will have a bearing on the numbers of asylum applications received. The pull factor thesis has been widely … [Read More] Complexity Reduction and Policy Consensus: Asylum seekers, the right to work, and the ‘pull factor’ thesis in the UK context – The British Journal of Politics and International Relations

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Posts are for information purposes and do not constitute endorsement by the Brotherhood of St Laurence