What does Big Data mean to public affairs research? Understanding the methodological and analytical challenges – The Impact Blog at LSE

Extract from an article by Ines Mergel, R. Karl Rethemeyer, and Kimberley R. Isett

The term ‘Big Data’ is often misunderstood or poorly defined, especially in the public sector. Ines Mergel, R. Karl Rethemeyer, and Kimberley R. Isett provide a definition that adequately encompasses the scale, collection processes, and sources of Big Data. However, while recognising its immense potential it is also important to consider the limitations when using Big Data as a policymaking tool. Using this data for purposes not previously envisioned can be problematic, researchers may encounter ethical issues, and certain demographics are often not captured or represented.

In the public sector, the term ‘Big Data’ is often misused, misunderstood, and poorly defined. Public sector practitioners and researchers frequently use the term to refer to large data sets that were administratively collected by a government agency. Though these data sets are usually quite large and can be used for predictive analytics, administrative data does not include the oceans of information that is created by private citizens through their interactions with each other online (such as social media or business transaction data) or through sensors in buildings, cars, and streets. Moreover, when public sector researchers and practitioners do consider broader definitions of Big Data they often overlook key political, ethical, and methodological complexities that may bias the insights gleaned from ‘going Big’. In our recent paper we seek to provide a clearer definition that is current and conversant with how other fields define Big Data, before turning to fundamental issues that public sector practitioners and researchers must keep in mind when using Big Data…(continues)

SOURCE: Ines Mergel, R. Karl Rethemeyer, and Kimberley R. Isett, “What does Big Data mean to public affairs research? Understanding the methodological and analytical challenges”, The Impact Blog at LSE, 08 Dec 2016

Link to full article

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