Self-regulation and Toxic Stress Reports – U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

Self-regulation and toxic stress [report 1]: Foundations for understanding self-regulation from an applied developmental perspective / Desiree W. Murray, , January, 2015

(OPRE Report No. 2015-21). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

We begin by defining self-regulation from an applied perspective within a normative developmental context and describe cognitive, emotional, and behavioral domains of self-regulation and how they interact. Next, we consider how stress and adversity may impact self-regulation. We then describe the developmental tasks of self-regulation from birth through young adulthood, with particular attention to contextual factors that may impact development. Within this framework, we propose a model of “co-regulation” for conceptualizing caregivers’ roles in supporting children’s self-regulation development, providing examples across the age span.

Self-regulation and toxic stress [report 2]: A review of ecological, biological, and developmental studies of self-regulation and stress / Amar Hamoudi, February, 2015
(OPRE Report No. 2015-30). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The goal of this report is to clarify how stress may impact the development of self-regulation. We will first operationalize stress and self-regulation as they are relevant to our empirical literature review, drawing from research across several scientific disciplines. Then we will discuss different perspectives of how stress and self-regulation interact and influence each other. From this foundation, we will identify important questions in the literature that we attempt to address with a methodical and comprehensive empirical review of human and nonhuman studies of stress and self-regulation. Following a summary of key findings, our report concludes with limitations of the current literature in this area and implications for interventions, the topic of the next report in this series.

Self-regulation and toxic stress report 3: A comprehensive review of self-regulation interventions from birth through young adulthood / Desiree W. Murray, February, 2016
(OPRE Report #2016-34). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

The overarching aim of this review was to inform the selection and use of self-regulation interventions within human services programs supported by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). For that reason, our focus was on universal and targeted interventions that could be used within the existing infrastructure of those human services programs, with particular attention to vulnerable populations living in adversity or with specific risk characteristics.

Self-regulation and toxic stress report 4: Implications for programs and practice / Desiree W. Murray, November, 2016
(OPRE Report No. 2016-97). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This report is the fourth and final in a series entitled Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress. The first three reports in this series laid out an applied framework for self-regulation development , described the effects of toxic stress on self-regulation development, and reviewed the existing interventions for youth from birth through young adulthood. The goal of this final report is to provide practical implications of this work for programs and populations relevant to the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). In this report, we first review key concepts for understanding self-regulation in context, including the relationship between stress and self-regulation. Next, we summarize key findings from our comprehensive review of self-regulation interventions, including the types of self-regulation interventions that have been evaluated, the types of populations that have been studied, and the strength of evidence for different types of outcomes for different ages. Finally and most importantly, we address how our current theory and knowledge of self-regulation may apply to different ACF programs, including those children and families living in adversity. For each developmental group examined from birth through young adulthood, specific considerations for key strategies and program elements are provided on separate pages that can be pulled out for review.

Appendix C: Effect size outcomes by intervention and developmental groups /Desiree W. Murray, February, 2016
(OPRE Report #2016-34). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

This Appendix summarizes the available evidence from our literature review for interventions that build self-regulation across development. This information is provided as a reference for the report entitled Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress: A Systematic Review of Self-Regulation Interventions, and should not be interpreted independently. The purpose of this Appendix is to present specific findings upon which this report’s conclusions were based.

SOURCE: Murray, Desiree W. [and Hamoudi, Amar]. “Self-regulation and Toxic Stress Reports.” U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, [Published 2015-2016]

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