The Case for Investing in Last Resort Housing – Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute (MSSI)

SGS undertakes CBA of providing last resort accommodation, in collaboration with MSSI

Extract

A cost benefit analysis prepared in collaboration with Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute at the University of Melbourne has found that it is cheaper to provide last resort housing to homeless people than to leave them sleeping rough.

The analysis found governments and society benefit more than they spend by providing last resort housing to homeless individuals. This is mainly through reduced healthcare costs, reduced crime, and helping people get back into employment or education.

This comprehensive cost-benefit analysis was commissioned by a team of experts from the University of Melbourne, NGOs, and architecture firms. SGS undertook the analysis.

The number of people sleeping rough in Melbourne’s streets has increased by over 70 per cent in the last two years. Homelessness is now at emergency levels. Key causes are the unaffordability of housing, people escaping domestic violence and a structural lack of social housing.

There has been a reduction in the supply of “last resort housing”. Last resort housing refers to legal rooming and boarding houses, and emergency accommodation.

On average, more than 40 requests for last resort housing are turned down across Victoria every day.

Our analysis shows that the government providing one last resort bed will generate a net benefit of $216,000 over 20 years. That averages to a net benefit of $10,800 per year.

The majority of those benefits (75%) flow to society and the remainder to the individual.

For every $1 invested in last resort beds to address the homelessness crisis, $2.70 worth of benefits are generated for the community (over 20 years).

In other words, the benefits of providing last resort housing outweigh the costs. There is much to gain in economic and social terms, both for government and society, by assisting the homeless.

This is because if homeless individuals find stable accommodation they require less healthcare and fewer emergency admissions, and they are less likely to be involved in crime (both as victims and perpetrators). They are more likely to reconnect with employment and education. Homelessness also incurs property blighting and nuisance costs. Importantly, last resort housing can greatly improve the quality of life of individuals.

Our analysis shows that the form of last resort housing which makes the most sense economically is the construction of new, permanent stock – especially medium to large-sized facilities. Converting existing buildings, and subsidising private rentals, are both worth considering as well especially in the short term.

SOURCE: Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute. “The case for investing in last resort housing.” MSSI website viewed 16 March 2017

Link to website & full report

See also:

Cost of Homelessness: Governments will save money by spending on accommodation services, study finds — ABC Online 16 March 2017

Homelessness: a $194 million problem for Victoria — Herald Sun 16 March 2017

‘Violation of human rights’: UN condemns Melbourne’s homeless … The Age13 March 2017

BroCAP is produced by the two librarians at the Brotherhood of St Laurence in Melbourne, Australia.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Select list(s):

Follow BroCAP on Twitter

Click on a date to search archive

March 2017
M T W T F S S
« Feb    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Disclaimer

Posts are for information purposes and do not constitute endorsement by the Brotherhood of St Laurence