Generation stalled: Young, underemployed and living precariously in Australia – Brotherhood of St Laurence

Extract Young Australians face a much more brutish job scenario than their parents or grandparents ever faced. Along with high rates of youth unemployment, they are also negotiating the threat posed by underemployment – which has now become an entrenched feature of the youth labour market. The youth unemployment rate for 15–24 year olds has … [Read More] Generation stalled: Young, underemployed and living precariously in Australia – Brotherhood of St Laurence

Social Embeddedness, Formal Labor Supply, and Participation in Informal Work (US) – International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy

ABSTRACT Purpose – This study analyzes data from the first-ever national-level study of informal work in the United States (U.S.) to test two prominent points of focus in the literature: how participation in informal work relates to social embeddedness and formal labor supply. This paper also provides a comparative test of the factors associated with exchange-based … [Read More] Social Embeddedness, Formal Labor Supply, and Participation in Informal Work (US) – International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy

Sinks of Social Exclusion or Springboards for Social Mobility? Analysing the Roles of Disadvantaged Neighbourhoods in Urban Australia – Urban Policy and Research

ABSTRACT Dominating policy discourse has been the hypothesis that residence in “poverty neighbourhoods” can compound individual disadvantage. Prominent here are concerns about social exclusion and spatial entrapment. A contrary perspective is that low income communities often contain substantial social capital and that accessing relatively affordable housing available in such places may provide a basis for … [Read More] Sinks of Social Exclusion or Springboards for Social Mobility? Analysing the Roles of Disadvantaged Neighbourhoods in Urban Australia – Urban Policy and Research

Housing and poverty: a longitudinal analysis – Housing Studies

ABSTRACT Cross-sectional research suggests that the British housing system weakens the link between income poverty and housing outcomes, but this reveals little about the long-term relationships. We examine the relationship between income poverty and housing pathways over an 18-year period to 2008, and develop consensual approaches to poverty estimation, housing deprivation, and the prevalence of … [Read More] Housing and poverty: a longitudinal analysis – Housing Studies

Timing it wrong: benefits, income tests, overpayments and debts – Inside Story

Extract from an article by Peter Whiteford and Jane Millar The Centrelink overpayments controversy highlights shortcomings in social security reforms in Australia and Britain Unexpected bills can be a challenge for any household. But for people who rely on social security payments, unexpected news of a significant debt – sometimes dating back years – can … [Read More] Timing it wrong: benefits, income tests, overpayments and debts – Inside Story

Penalty rates for Sunday, holiday work to be slashed after landmark decision by Fair Work Commission – Sydney Morning Herald

Extract from an article by Nick Toscano and Anna Patty Hundreds of thousands of Australians who work on Sundays will have their take-home pay slashed after a landmark ruling by the national workplace umpire. The Fair Work Commission on Thursday morning announced Sunday penalty rates paid in retail, fast food, hospitality and pharmacy industries will be … [Read More] Penalty rates for Sunday, holiday work to be slashed after landmark decision by Fair Work Commission – Sydney Morning Herald

Record employment not helping working-age families avoid poverty, new research shows (UK) – Intergenerational Foundation

Extract from an article by David Kingman David Kingman looks at the findings of a new piece of research into the living standards. Since the “Great Recession” began in 2008, one of the biggest successes of the UK economy has been the so-called “jobs miracle”, which has seen the number of people in some kind of … [Read More] Record employment not helping working-age families avoid poverty, new research shows (UK) – Intergenerational Foundation

Is SES really that important for educational outcomes in Australia? A review and some recent evidence – The Australian Educational Researcher

ABSTRACT This paper demonstrates that the emphasis on students’ socioeconomic status (SES) in research and policy circles in Australia is unwarranted. The bivariate relationships between SES and educational outcomes are only moderate and the effects of SES are quite small when taking into account cognitive ability or prior achievement. These two influences have much stronger … [Read More] Is SES really that important for educational outcomes in Australia? A review and some recent evidence – The Australian Educational Researcher

Wages, government payments and other income of indigenous and non-indigenous Australians – Australian Journal of Labour Economics

ABSTRACT This paper compares the level and source of income for Indigenous and non- Indigenous Australians using data from the 2011 wave of the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA). Three sources of income are considered: wages and salaries; government benefits; and income from businesses, investments and other private transfers. Consistent with many … [Read More] Wages, government payments and other income of indigenous and non-indigenous Australians – Australian Journal of Labour Economics

We can’t go on pretending that poverty is solved by getting a job (UK) – British Politics & Policy at LSE

Extract from an article by Chris Johnes Chris Johnes argues that getting a job is not necessarily a route out of poverty. Rising costs and falling real wages means that having a job won’t necessarily allow you to make ends meet. What’s worse, the auterity programme is hitting low-income households disproportionately hardest. We must, therefore, rethink the prevailing attitude towards taxes and … [Read More] We can’t go on pretending that poverty is solved by getting a job (UK) – British Politics & Policy at LSE

Exploding myths about the gig economy – VOX: CEPR’s Policy Portal

Extract from an article by Jacques Bughin and Jan Mischke The ‘gig economy’ refers to the independent workforce, including those drawing income from new digital platforms such as Uber and Airbnb. This column uses a survey of 8,000 respondents in the US, the UK, Germany, Sweden, France, and Spain to explode some myths about this relatively … [Read More] Exploding myths about the gig economy – VOX: CEPR’s Policy Portal

What if jobs are not the solution but the problem (US) – Aeon

Extract from an article by James Livingston Work means everything to us Americans. For centuries – since, say, 1650 – we’ve believed that it builds character (punctuality, initiative, honesty, self-discipline, and so forth). We’ve also believed that the market in labour, where we go to find work, has been relatively efficient in allocating opportunities and incomes. … [Read More] What if jobs are not the solution but the problem (US) – Aeon

Basic income for all: a 500-year-old idea whose time has come? The Guardian

Extract from an article by Gideon Haigh Just as the fourth industrial revolution in Australia will transform jobs, it will do the same for the welfare system. Universal basic income, targeted cash transfers, negative income tax and a family wage could be ways to guarantee living standards for ordinary people and keep the economy afloat.. n … [Read More] Basic income for all: a 500-year-old idea whose time has come? The Guardian

One million Australians want more hours of work – Australian Bureau of Statistics

Media release One million Australians want more hours of work, according to the latest results from the ABS’ Participation, Job Search and Mobility Survey. In February 2016 there were one million underemployed workers, of whom 945,400 worked part-time. A further 76,700 usually worked full-time, but worked part-time in the reference week due to economic reasons, … [Read More] One million Australians want more hours of work – Australian Bureau of Statistics

Flexible work: how the gig economy benefits some more than others – The Conversation

Extract from an article by Julie Davies and Mark Horan Self-employment is on the rise in the UK. The latest government statistics put it at 4.79m, which represents 15% of all people in work. And, in recognition of this changing nature of employment, the prime minister has commissioned a review of workers’ rights. One of its chief … [Read More] Flexible work: how the gig economy benefits some more than others – The Conversation

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